The following competencies are covered in the course INFO 4413, 5513 and 6613. The materials used are from a draft set of instructional materials developed by NIATEC. In addition students use Computer Security Lab Manual by V. J. Nestler, Conklin, and White by McGraw Hill

The successful student in INFO 4413 demonstrates entry-level competency by defining, describing, identifying, or addressing the following terms via slide shows, modules, written or oral exams

Competency Student Checklist
1. Accreditation  
2. Anti-virus systems  
3. Application development control  
4. Assessments for use during certification of information systems  
5. Assurance  
6. Backup critical information  
7. Breaches  
8. Certification policies as related to organizational requirements  
9. Change control policies  
10. Computing and telecommunications hardware/software  
11. Concepts of availability, integrity, confidentiality, authentication, and non-repudiation  
12. Configuration control  
13. Configuration control (management)  
14. Copyright protection and licensing  
15. Countermeasures used to prevent software piracy  
16. Decentralized/distributed -- single sign on (SSO) (i.e., kerberos)  
17. Defense in depth  
18. Digital non-repudiation  
19. Digital signatures  
20. Due care (due diligence)  
21. EMSEC/TEMPEST security countermeasures  
22. EMSEC/TEMPEST security safeguards  
23. End systems (i.e., workstations, notebooks, PDA [personal digital assistant], smartphones, etc.)  
24. Error/audit log  
25. Facility support systems (i.e., fire protection and HAVC)  
26. Functional requirements for operating system integrity  
27. Generally accepted systems security principles  
28. Goals, mission, and objectives of the organization  
29. Incident response  
30. Incidents  
31. Information availability  
32. Information ownership  
33. Information sensitivity  
34. Internal controls and security  
35. Internet security  
36. Internet security procedures  
37. Isolation and mediation  
38. Key creation/distribution  
39. Key recovery  
40. Key storage/destruction  
41. Legal requirements  
42. Magnetic media degaussing  
43. Marking, handling, storing, and destroying of classified, unclassified, and e information & media  
44. Marking, handling, storing, and destroying of sensitive information & media  
45. Media (i.e., tape, paper or disks) management  
46. Message digests (i.e., md5, SHA, HMAC)  
47. Multilevel security  
48. Need-to-know/least privilege  
49. Network firewalls  
50. Operating systems security procedures  
51. Operational procedure review  
52. Operator/administrator privileges  
53. Organizational accountability policies  
54. Organizational e-mail privacy policies  
55. Organizational information assurance (I/A) policies  
56. Organizational policies relating to separation of duties  
57. Organizational security procedures  
58. Password management  
59. Physical security  
60. PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) requirements  
61. Policies relating to marking of classified, unclassified and sensitive information  
62. Privacy and protection  
63. Protected distribution systems  
64. Record retention  
65. Records management  
66. Reporting  
67. Resource custodian  
68. Resource misuse prevention  
69. Safeguards used to prevent software piracy  
70. Secure data deletion for media reuse  
71. Security domain  
72. Single sign-on  
73. Subjects and objects  
74. System security architecture  
75. System software controls  
76. Testing policies  
77. Trusted computer base (TCB) reference monitors and kernels  
78. Validation policies  
79. Violations  
80. Zone of control  
81. Zoning  
82. A method to force regular password changes and the limitations of the method  
83. Access control physical, logical, and administrative configurations  
84. Access rights and permissions  
85. Accountability and monitoring (i.e., correction, alarms, audit trail)  
86. Aggregation  
87. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- mainframe  
88. Application layer security protocols (i.e., secure electronic transactions, secure hypertext, secure remote procedure call)  
89. Attack actions as training issues  
90. Automated security tools  
91. Automated tools for security compliance  
92. Automated tools for security test  
93. Biometrics  
94. Cable characteristics (i.e., twisted pair, fiber)  
95. Centralized/remote authentication access controls  
96. Computer network defense  
97. Concentrators  
98. Configuration management  
99. Continuity/contingency planning  
100. Control techniques and policies (i.e., discretionary, mandatory, and rule f least  
101. Data access  
102. Data link layer security  
103. Data mining  
104. Data ownership and custodianship  
105. Databases and data warehousing vulnerabilities, threats and protections  
106. Disaster recovery  
107. Disaster recovery management  
108. Disaster recovery oversight  
109. Disaster recovery plan testing  
110. Disaster recovery policies and procedures  
111. Disaster recovery procedures  
112. Discretionary access controls  
113. Documentation policy and procedures  
114. E-mail privacy countermeasures  
115. E-mail privacy safeguards  
116. EMSEC/TEMPEST security as it relates to the risk management process  
117. end systems (i.e., workstations, notebooks, PDA, smartphones, etc.)  
118. FAX security policies/procedures  
119. Front-end processors, hubs, modems, multiplexers  
120. Housekeeping procedures  
121. Incident response policies  
122. Inference  
123. Information operations  
124. Information sensitivity in relation to organizational policies  
125. Information states procedures  
126. IPSEC authentication and confidentiality  
127. LAN/WAN security  
128. Major operating system security features  
129. Mandatory access controls  
130. Modes of operation  
131. Multiple secure levels  
132. Network architecture/topologies (i.e., ETHERNET, FDDI, bus, star, mesh, etc.)  
133. Network components (hardware, firmware, software, and media)  
134. Network layer security  
135. Network protocols  
136. Network types  
137. Object reuse  
138. On what zoning and zone of control ratings are based  
139. One-time passwords  
140. Operating system integrity  
141. Operating system integrity procedures  
142. Operating system security features  
143. Organizational policies relevant to internet security  
144. Organizational security policies relative to electronic records management  
145. OSI model  
146. Patch panels  
147. Physical layer  
148. Policies relevant to network security  
149. Polyinstantiation  
150. Presentation layer  
151. Purpose and contents of national computer security center tg-005, trusted network interpretation (tni) or red book as examples  
152. Purpose and contents of NSTISSAM compusec/1-99, advisory memorandum on the transition from the trusted computer system evaluation criteria to the international common criteria for information technology security evaluation  
153. Relevant fax security policies  
154. Routers  
155. Safeguards  
156. Secure systems operations procedures  
157. Security domains as applicable to organizational policies  
158. Separation of duties  
159. Separation of duties as a countermeasure  
160. Separation of duties policies and procedures  
161. Session layer  
162. Situations in which separation of duties is appropriate or mandatory  
163. Switches  
164. System security safeguards  
165. The different categories of activities which may be logged  
166. The major benefit gained through use of audit trails and logging policies  
167. The organizational/agency systems emergency/incident response team  
168. Transport control protocol/ internet protocol (TCP/IP)  
169. Transport control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP)  
170. Transport layer security (i.e., secure socket layer [SSL]  
171. Transport layer security (i.e., secure socket layer [SSL])  
172. Tunneling protocol (pptp), layer 2 tunneling protocol (l2tp)  
173. Virtual private network (VPN) (i.e., ssh2, socks)  
174. Wan security procedures  
175. Ways to provide protection for internet connections  
176. What is meant by countermeasures  
177. What is meant by safeguards  
178. Wide area network (wan) security policies  
179. Wireless security  
180. Workstation security policies  
181. Zoning and zone of control policies  
182. Access control attacks (brute force, dictionary, spoofing, denial of service, etc.)  
183. Alarms, signals and reports  
184. An attack  
185. Appropriate security architecture for use in assigned I/S  
186. Appropriate sources for updates and patches  
187. Attack actions  
188. Audit collection requirements  
189. Audit tools  
190. Automated tools for security testing  
191. Basic/generic management issues  
192. Certification tools  
193. Certified EMSEC/TEMPEST technical authority (CTTA)  
194. Countermeasures  
195. Different types of threat  
196. Disposition of media and data policies and procedures  
197. DoDD 8500.1 policies (or appropriate civil agency guidance)  
198. EMSEC/TEMPEST control policies  
199. EMSEC/TEMPEST security policies  
200. EMSEC/TEMPEST security procedures  
201. Examples of corrective actions  
202. Firewall architecture (i.e., bastion host, DMZ)  
203. Firewall technology (i.e., packet filtering, data inspection)  
204. Fundamental concepts of multilevel security  
205. Gateways and routers  
206. Identification and authentication techniques  
207. Information ownership of data held under his/her cognizance  
208. Information resource custodian  
209. Information resource owner  
210. Information Security Technology Security Evaluation Criteria (ITSEC) policies  
211. Intrusion detection systems  
212. Law enforcement interfaces  
213. Methods of intrusion detection  
214. National COMSEC manager (custodian)  
215. Network security software  
216. NSTISSP 11 (Common Criteria) policies  
217. Organizational COMSEC manager (Custodian)  
218. Organizational wireless security policy  
219. Organizational/agency systems emergency response team  
220. Organizational/agency systems emergency/incident response team  
221. Password management systems  
222. Protective technologies  
223. Secure e-mail (i.e., PGP, S/MIME)  
224. Sources of AT&E materials  
225. Storage media control policies and procedures  
226. Storage media protection and control  
227. Storage media protection policies and procedures  
228. Systems security standards policies  
229. The dedicated mode of operation  
230. Verification and validation process policies  
231. Access control software management with staff  
232. Account management with staff  
233. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- client-based (i.e., applets, active-x)  
234. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats – mainframe  
235. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- malicious code (i.e., Trojan horses, trap doors, viruses, worms)  
236. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- server-based  
237. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- web-based (i.e., xml, saml)  
238. Authentication with staff  
239. Biometric access management with staff  
240. Configuration management with staff  
241. Disposition procedures with staff  
242. Intrusion detection management with staff  
243. Monitoring management with staff  
244. Password management with staff  
245. Questions from users about due care  
246. Recovery procedures with staff  
247. Staff about intrusion detection  
248. Staff about legal access restrictions  
249. Staff about legal configuration restrictions  
250. Staff about legal monitoring restrictions  
251. Staff about monitoring and auditing intrusion detection policies  
252. System security architecture study  
253. Unauthorized access incident reporting with staff  
254. Work force about access control software management procedures  
255. Work force about access management procedures  
256. Work force about account management procedures  
257. Work force about auditing and logging management procedures  
258. Work force about authentication procedures  
259. Work force about monitoring management procedures  
260. Discuss System Test and Evaluation (ST&E) Plan and Procedures  
261. Recommend revisions to System Test and Evaluation (ST&E) Plan and Procedures  
262. Differentiate security-related changes from non-security-related changes  
263. Anti-criminal activity preparedness planning (law enforcement)  
264. Known means of keystroke monitoring  
265. Vendor cooperation  
266. Security policy for backup procedures  
267. Input to recovery plan  
268. Appropriate authority in witness interviewing/interrogation  
269. Evidence identification/preservation  
270. Investigations as requested  
271. Means of electronic monitoring  
272. Staff about intrusion deterrents  
273. Operate a KMI-enabled system  
274. Requirements key management  

The successful student in INFO 4413 demonstrates intermediate-level competency by explaining, implementing, discussing, or using the following concepts in case study workshops and hands-on exercises

Competency Student Checklist
275. Access control attacks (brute force, dictionary, spoofing, denial of service, etc.)  
276. Access control policies  
277. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- client-based (i.e., applets, active-X)  
278. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- mainframe  
279. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- malicious code (i.e., Trojan horses, trap doors, viruses, worms)  
280. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- server-based  
281. Application and system vulnerabilities and threats -- web-based (i.e., xml, saml)  
282. Assessments used during system certification process  
283. Attack actions  
284. Attack actions addressed in training  
285. Cable characteristics (i.e., twisted pair, fiber)  
286. Capabilities offered by expert audit tools  
287. Capabilities offered by expert security tools  
288. Centralized/remote authentication access controls  
289. Computing and telecommunications hardware/ software  
290. Concentrators  
291. Control techniques and policies (i.e., discretionary, mandatory, and rule of least privilege decentralized/distributed -- single sign on (SSO) (i.e., kerberos)  
292. Data mining  
293. Databases and data warehousing vulnerabilities, threats and protections  
294. Elements of technical platforms  
295. EMSEC/TEMPEST security as it relates to the risk management process  
296. End systems (i.e., workstations, notebooks, PDA, smartphones, etc.)  
297. Front-end processors, hubs, modems, multiplexers  
298. Housekeeping procedures  
299. How the security architecture is affected by assurance, trust, and confidence countermeasures; covert channels; EMSEC/TEMPEST; maintenance hooks and privileged programs; states attacks (i.e., time of check / time of use); and timing attacks  
300. Identification and authentication techniques  
301. Importance of sound facility management procedures  
302. Incident response policies  
303. Inference  
304. IPSEC authentication and confidentiality  
305. LAN/WAN security  
306. Major benefits of auditing  
307. Multiple secure levels  
308. Network architecture/topologies (i.e., ethernet, fddi, bus, star, mesh, etc.)  
309. Network components (hardware, firmware, software, and media)  
310. Network protocols  
311. Network types  
312. Object reuse  
313. Organizational/agency systems emergency response team role  
314. OSI model  
315. Patch panels  
316. Polyinstantiation  
317. Principles of network security procedures  
318. Public key infrastructure (PKI) (i.e. Certification authorities, etc)  
319. Risk management  
320. Routers  
321. SA COMSEC procedures  
322. Security domains as applicable to organizational policies  
323. Single/multifactor authentication (knowledge based i.e., password/pass phrase, one time, smart cards and characteristic based i.e., biometrics)  
324. Switches  
325. System security architecture study  
326. Threat in its application to education, training, and awareness  
327. Threats/vulnerabilities of end systems (i.e., workstations, notebooks, PDA, smartphones, etc.)  
328. Transport control protocol/ internet protocol (TCP/IP)  
329. Tunneling protocol (PPTP), layer 2 tunneling protocol (l2tp)  
330. Virtual private network (VPN) (i.e., ssh2, socks)  
331. Ways to provide protection for Internet connections  
332. What is meant by zoning and zone of control  
333. Wireless security  
334. Zoning and zone of control procedures  
335. Zoning and zone of control ratings  
336. Access control physical, logical, and administrative configurations  
337. Access rights and permissions  
338. Accountability and monitoring (i.e., correction, alarms, audit trail)  
339. Accreditation plan/process  
340. Application layer security protocols (i.e., secure electronic transactions, secure hypertext, secure remote procedure call)  
341. AT&E as a countermeasure  
342. Attack response  
343. Authentication policies and procedures  
344. Automated security tools  
345. Automated tool for security test  
346. Automated tools for security compliance  
347. Automated tools for security testing  
348. Awareness materials as part of job  
349. Change control policies  
350. Change controls  
351. Compartmented/partitioned mode  
352. Configuration control  
353. Control techniques and policies (i.e., discretionary, mandatory, and rule of least privilege  
354. Copyright protection and licensing  
355. Countermeasures to deter/mitigate attack threats (i.e., malicious code, flooding, spamming)  
356. Data link layer security  
357. Data ownership and custodianship  
358. Decentralized/distributed -- single sign on (SSO) (i.e., kerberos)  
359. Disaster recovery  
360. Disaster recovery plan testing  
361. Disaster recovery procedures  
362. Disposition of media and data policies and procedures  
363. Email security (i.e., PGP, PEM)  
364. EMSEC/TEMPEST security countermeasures  
365. EMSEC/TEMPEST security safeguards  
366. Evidence preservation IAW legal guidance  
367. Facility management procedures  
368. FAX security policies/procedures  
369. Firewall architecture (i.e., bastion host, DMZ)  
370. Firewall technology (i.e., packet filtering, data inspection)  
371. Formal approval  
372. Gateways and routers  
373. Incident response policies and procedures  
374. Incident response policy/procedures  
375. Install a patch from an appropriate source  
376. Internet security  
377. Intrusion detection policies  
378. Multiple patches with a single batch file  
379. Network layer security  
380. Network security procedures  
381. Network security software  
382. Operating system from appropriate source  
383. Operating systems security procedures  
384. Operational procedure review  
385. OPSEC in conformance with organizational policies  
386. Organizational IA policies  
387. Organizational/agency systems emergency response team reports and advisories  
388. Organizational/agency systems emergency/incident response team security reporting  
389. Secure data communications  
390. Secure e-mail (i.e., PGP, s/mime)  
391. Secure voice and facsimile communications  
392. Security domain  
393. Security patch or upgrade  
394. Transport layer security (i.e., secure socket layer [SSL])  
395. WAN security procedures  
396. Access authorization  
397. Accreditation  
398. Aggregation  
399. Anti-criminal activity preparedness planning (law enforcement)  
400. Anti-virus management  
401. Assessments for use during certification of information systems  
402. Assurance  
403. Attacks response  
404. Authentication mechanisms  
405. Backup critical information  
406. Breaches  
407. Certification policies as related to organizational requirements  
408. Computer network defense  
409. Computing and telecommunications hardware/software  
410. COMSEC procedures  
411. Concepts of availability, integrity, confidentiality, authentication, and non-repudiation  
412. Configuration control (management)  
413. Continuity/contingency plan  
414. Database integrity  
415. Defense in depth  
416. Different levels of countermeasures assurance  
417. Different levels of safeguards assurance  
418. Digital non-repudiation  
419. Digital signatures  
420. Disaster recovery planning  
421. Disposition of classified information  
422. Documentation  
423. DoDD 8500.1 policies (or appropriate civil agency guidance)  
424. Due care (due diligence)  
425. Electronic records management  
426. Electronic records management relative to compliance with organizational policies and procedures  
427. Electronic records oversight  
428. EMSEC/TEMPEST control policies  
429. EMSEC/TEMPEST security policies  
430. EMSEC/TEMPEST security procedures  
431. Evidence preservation  
432. Facility support systems (i.e., fire protection and HVAC)  
433. Formal approval to operate  
434. Functional requirements for operating system integrity  
435. Fundamental concepts of multilevel security  
436. Generally accepted systems security principles  
437. Goals, mission, and objectives of the organization  
438. Incident response  
439. Incident response procedure  
440. Incidents  
441. Information management  
442. Information operations  
443. Information sensitivity  
444. Internal controls and security  
445. Internet security procedures  
446. Intrusion detection  
447. Intrusion detection resources and policies  
448. Law enforcement interfaces  
449. Legal requirements  
450. Magnetic media degaussing as an example of destruction  
451. Marking of sensitive information procedures (defined in c.f.r. 32 section 2003, national security information - standard forms) as an example  
452. Marking, handling, storing, and destroying of classified, unclassified, and sensitive information & media  
453. Media (i.e., tape, paper or disks) management  
454. Message digests (i.e., md5, sha, hmac)  
455. Multilevel security  
456. Multiple secure level  
457. Need-to-know/least privilege  
458. Network firewalls  
459. NSTISSP 11 (Common Criteria) policies  
460. Object reuse policy and procedures  
461. Objectives of security inspections as a training issue  
462. Objectives of security reviews as a training issue  
463. Operations security (OPSEC) in conformance with organizational policies  
464. Operator/administrator privileges  
465. Organizational accountability policies  
466. Organizational area network (LAN) security as related to organizational policies  
467. Organizational e-mail privacy policies  
468. Organizational policies  
469. Organizational policies relating to secure systems operations  
470. Organizational policies relating to separation of duties  
471. Organizational wireless security policy  
472. Physical security policies  
473. Policies relating to marking of classified, unclassified, and sensitive information  
474. Policy enforcement  
475. Principle elements of security training  
476. Privacy act provisions  
477. Privacy and protection  
478. Privileges  
479. Proper use of security safeguards  
480. Record retention  
481. Records management  
482. Reporting  
483. Requirements for security awareness, training, and education  
484. Resource custodian  
485. Resource misuse prevention  
486. Safeguard corrective actions  
487. Secure data deletion for media reuse  
488. Security education  
489. Security inspections  
490. Security policies relating to ethics  
491. Separation of duties as a countermeasure  
492. Significant agency specific security policies  
493. System security architecture  
494. Testing policies  
495. Validation policies  
496. Verification and validation process policies  
497. Violations  
498. Wan security policies  
499. Workstation security policies  
500. Zoning and zone of control policies  
501. Access control software  
502. Alarms, signals, and reports  
503. Alarms, signals, and reports in accordance with existing policies and procedures  
504. Anti-virus tools and procedures  
505. Audit trails and logging policies  
506. Biometrics  
507. Client-server security  
508. Countermeasures  
509. Database security features  
510. Disaster recovery management/oversight  
511. Disaster recovery policies and procedures  
512. Disposition of classified info  
513. Disposition of media and data  
514. Document labeling  
515. Documentation policy and procedures  
516. Emergency destruction  
517. Error log  
518. Expert system tools (i.e., audit reduction and intrusion detection) available  
519. Intrusion detection resources  
520. Isolation and mediation  
521. Key management techniques  
522. KMI applications  
523. KMI products  
524. Management/oversight change controls  
525. Modes of operation  
526. Network access controls as designed  
527. Operating system security features  
528. Safeguards  
529. Separation of duties policies and procedures  
530. Single sign-on  
531. Organizational/agency systems emergency/incident response team  
532. Configuration management  
533. Information ownership of data held under his/her cognizance  
534. Education, training, literacy and awareness  
535. Audit collection requirements  
536. Disaster recovery operations  
537. Security policy for backup procedures  
538. Different categories of activities which may be logged  
539. Organizational password management policy  
540. Risks to ISSO  
541. Account deletions  
542. Employees to seek education in IA as a countermeasure  
543. Security education requirements for information system users  

The successful student in INFO 4413 demonstrates advanced-level competency by verifying, using, evaluating, or performing the following terms in discussion seminars, readings, research papers or essays

Competency Student Checklist
544. Implement a patch from an appropriate source  
545. Implementation of a security patch or upgrade  
546. Implementation of access authorization  
547. Implementation of audit trails and logging policies  
548. Implementation of authentication policies and procedures  
549. Implementation of awareness materials as part of job  
550. Implementation of change control policies  
551. Implementation of configuration control  
552. Implementation of continuity/contingency plan  
553. Implementation of copyright protection and licensing  
554. Implementation of countermeasures  
555. Implementation of database security features  
556. Implementation of disaster recovery plan testing  
557. Implementation of disaster recovery planning  
558. Implementation of disaster recovery plans, policies, and procedures  
559. Implementation of disaster recovery policies and procedures  
560. Implementation of disaster recovery procedures  
561. Implementation of disposition of media and data  
562. Implementation of disposition of media and data policies and procedures  
563. Implementation of document labeling  
564. Implementation of documentation  
565. Implementation of documentation policy and procedures  
566. Implementation of electronic records management  
567. Implementation of EMSEC/TEMPEST control policies  
568. Implementation of EMSEC/TEMPEST security policies  
569. Implementation of facility management procedures  
570. Implementation of FAX security policies/procedures  
571. Implementation of formal approval to operate  
572. Implementation of functional requirements for operating system integrity  
573. Implementation of incident response  
574. Implementation of incident response policy/procedures are implemented  
575. Implementation of internet security procedures  
576. Implementation of intrusion detection  
577. Implementation of intrusion detection is implemented  
578. Implementation of intrusion detection posture  
579. Implementation of intrusion detection resources and policies  
580. Implementation of management/oversight change controls  
581. Implementation of marking of sensitive information procedures (defined in C.F.R. 32 Section 2003, National Security Information – Standard Forms) as an example  
582. Implementation of multiple patches with a single batch file  
583. Implementation of network security procedures  
584. Implementation of network security software  
585. Implementation of operating system from appropriate source  
586. Implementation of operating systems security procedures  
587. Implementation of operational procedure review  
588. Implementation of OPSEC in conformance with organizational policies  
589. Implementation of organizational accountability policies  
590. Implementation of organizational e-mail privacy policies  
591. Implementation of organizational IA policies  
592. Implementation of organizational policies relating to separation of duties  
593. Implementation of policies relating to marking of classified, unclassified, and sensitive information  
594. Implementation of policy enforcement  
595. Implementation of safeguards  
596. Implementation of security inspection report recommendations  
597. Implementation of separation of duties policies and procedures  
598. Implementation of validation and testing policies  
599. Implementation of validation policies  
600. Implementation of verification and validation process policies  
601. Implementation of WAN security policies  
602. Implementation of WAN security procedures  
603. Implementation of workstation security policies  
604. Zoning and zone of control policies  
605. Alarms, signals, and reports  
606. Centralized/remote authentication access controls  
607. Decentralized/distributed -- single sign on (SSO) (i.e., kerberos)  
608. Remote access protocols (i.e., ppp/chap/pap/eap)  
609. Security domain  
610. Single/multifactor authentication (knowledge based i.e., password/pass phrase, one time, tokens/smart cards and characteristic based i.e., biometrics)  
611. Automated security tools  
612. Automated tools for security compliance  
613. Automated tools for security testing  
614. Continuity/contingency plan testing results  
615. Disaster recovery plan exercise results  
616. Countermeasures  
617. Incident response  
618. Intrusion detection  
619. Assessments for use during certification of information systems  
620. Generally accepted systems security principles  
621. Implementation of transport layer security (i.e., secure socket layer [SSL])  
622. Information states procedures  
623. Lessons-learned from disaster recovery test in new disaster recovery plan  
624. Annalyze and summarize an attack  
NIATEC National Science Foundation Information Assurance Directorate Department of Homeland Security CISSE Scholarship For Service